Mayor – News – June 2022 – New Orleans Mosquito, Termite and Rodent Control Board Announces National and Louisiana Mosquito Awa

NEW ORLEANS — In recognition of National Mosquito Control Awareness Week taking place June 19 – June 25, 2022, the New Orleans Mosquito, Termite and Rodent Control Board (NOMTRCB) is taking the opportunity to spotlight the importance of mosquito control, provide tips on how to reduce mosquitoes around your residence and how to reduce bites. NOMTRCB is also highlighting its role in protecting the health of our residents and visitors.

New Orleans has more than 30 different species of mosquitoes. Some never bite people and instead prefer birds or amphibian hosts. Other mosquitoes prefer to feed on humans or other mammals. New Orleans has only a few species of medical importance. Some species feed during the daytime, while others feed at night. Regardless of these differences, all mosquito species have a similar life cycle that is dependent upon water.

NOMTRCB asks that residents take 10 minutes a week to inspect the area around their homes and yards remove standing water. It is imperative for residents to remain vigilant in removing standing water by emptying containers. Water in containers that cannot be removed, such as bird baths, sugar kettles, pools and ponds, should be changed weekly. At this time of the year, mosquitoes can develop from egg to adult within seven to 10 days, highlighting the importance of checking your property for standing water on a weekly basis. Remove trash and clutter, including discarded tires, buckets, tarps and any other items that may collect water. Swimming pools and fountains should be operational and circulating. A mosquito can lay eggs and develop in a space as small as a bottle cap, so every container counts.

The City encourages residents to protect themselves from mosquito bites by limiting outdoor activities between dusk and dawn. Mosquito-proof homes by maintaining screens on windows and doors and using A/C or fans if possible. If outside for long periods of time, especially at night, use insect repellents containing CDC-approved active ingredients such as DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus. When using insect repellent, always follow the recommendations on the product label.

To report standing water, unkept swimming pools, dumped tires, or other mosquito-related issues, please contact us through one of the following methods:

For additional information regarding West Nile virus, visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s website: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/qa/prevention.htm.

SAFETY TIPS

Protecting Yourself

  • Reduce mosquito exposure by limiting outdoor activities between dusk and dawn.
  • Use air-conditioning or fans and make sure window and door screens are in good repair to prevent mosquitoes from getting inside.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and pants while outside.
  • The CDC recommends using repellents containing EPA-registered active ingredients including DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus.
  • When using repellent, always follow the recommendations on the product label.

Protecting Your Home

  • Eliminate standing water around your home, where mosquitoes breed.
  • Remove trash and clutter, dispose of discarded tires and containers that can hold water. Turn over wading pools, buckets, trash cans, children’s toys or anything that could collect water.
  • Change water weekly in containers that cannot be removed, such as pet dishes or bird baths. Scrub the side of the containers each week to remove any eggs that have been deposited.
  • Rain barrels and other water collection devices must be screened and collected water should be used within one week.
  • Aerate ornamental pools, fountains and sugar kettles, or stock them with fish.
  • Report illegal dumping, water leaks and unattended swimming pools by calling 311.
  • Call 311 report mosquito problems.

Tires

  • Tires are easily filled with rainwater and collect leaves and litter, providing ideal breeding conditions for mosquito larvae. Removal of scrap tires will eliminate a prolific mosquito habitat.
  • Residents can call 311 to request a bulk waste pickup of up to four tires. Tires should be stacked curbside next to City-issued trash containers.
  • Tires in front of abandoned lots, unoccupied properties or businesses are ineligible for pick up and will not be collected. This issue is currently being addressed through City-coordinated, cooperative efforts towards treatment and removal.

For more information and updates, please follow NOMTRCB on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @nolamosquito.

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