‘Frankenstein fish’ makes fisherman an Instagram sensation

It was like Frankenstein’s sea monster.

A Norwegian fisherman is making waves online after sharing photos of a mysterious sea creature that he’s dubbed “Frankenstein’s fish” due to its ghoulish, quilt-like countenance. A photo of the freaky fish is currently blowing up on Instagram as amateur oceanographers try to guess the mystery fish’s identity.

The critter was snapped by Roman Fedortsov, a commercial trawlerman stationed near the port city of Murmansk, Russia, who photographs the nightmarish denizens of the deep that he’s snared accidentally while trawling for fish, All That’s Interesting reported. Some of his martian-looking bycatch has included bearded sea dragons, angler fish and other ocean dwellers straight out of a Jacques Cousteau night terror.

“No need to invent ‘Monsters.’ Nature has already done it,” the angler once posted on Twitter.

The critter was a ghost shark — also known as a chimaera, ratfish, spook fish, or rabbitfish — a deep-sea denizen that’s related to sharks and rays.
Jam Press/Roman Fedortsov

One of Fedortsov’s most bizarre finds, uploaded a week ago for his more than 649,000 Instagram followers, entailed a translucent white fish with a sunken green eye, thresher-like tail and fins like bat wings, Jam Press reported. Most peculiar perhaps were strange, stitch-like markings that made the fish look like it was haphazardly sewn together, à la Frankenstein or “Jigsaw” from “The Punisher” comics.

The ghostly sea creature baffled gawkers on the ‘Gram, with one armchair marine biologist comparing it to a “Pokémon.”

“Wow looks like a Cartoon Fish,” exclaimed one fan.

However, several sea-savvy social media users correctly guessed that the critter was a ghost shark — also known as a chimaera, ratfish, spook fish or rabbitfish — which is related to sharks and rays, according to Smithsonian magazine. The elusive fish, which is comprised of cartilage rather than bones, is rarely seen by humans as it’s found at depths between 650 and 8,530 feet, according to the UK organization Shark Trust. In fact, despite being known to science for quite some time, it was captured on camera for the first time in 2016, National Geographic reported.

“No need to invent 'Monsters.'  Nature has already done it,” the angler once posted on Twitter.
“No need to invent ‘Monsters.’ Nature has already done it,” the angler once posted on Twitter.
Jam Press/Roman Fedortsov
One of the alien-like denizens of the deep commercial angler Roman Fedortsov accidentally dredge up while trawling the ocean for fish.
One of the alien-like denizens that commercial angler Roman Fedortsov accidentally dredge up while trawling the ocean for fish.
Jam Press/Roman Fedortsov

In a similarly incredible maritime find in April, authorities discovered a rare, live giant squid stranded on a beach in Obama, Japan.

“No need to invent 'Monsters.'  Nature has already done it,” Fedortsov once Tweeted.
“No need to invent ‘Monsters.’ Nature has already done it,” Fedortsov once tweeted.
Jam Press/Roman Fedortsov
Some of Fedortsov's bycatch has included bearded sea dragons, angler fish, and other ocean dwellers straight out of a Jacques Cousteau night terror.
Some of Fedortsov’s bycatch has included bearded sea dragons, angler fish, and other ocean dwellers straight out of a Jacques Cousteau night terror.
Jam Press/Roman Fedortsov

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